Support Near You

Neonatal IAPT Talking therapy support
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Support near you

If your baby has been born unwell or premature, they may require a stay in the neonatal unit. Understandably, this can be a very difficult and exhausting time for parents and families. Parents in particular are at greater risk of anxiety, depression and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). 
How you are feeling will be individual to you but it is very normal to feel overwhelmed and confused when you have a baby in hospital. It often helps to talk about your feelings with a trained professional. Talking therapies is a good place to start if you are struggling to process or cope with your feelings.

What is IAPT?

Improving Access to Psychological Therapies (IAPT) is a widely recognised programme that has drastically improved the treatment of adult anxiety disorders and depression in England. 

This programme is particularly useful for families who have a baby in neonatal care as this can be an especially traumatic time with long lasting impact. 

IAPT offers a free and confidential service and is delivered by qualified and accredited practitioners. IAPT treats many common mental health conditions including depression, anxiety and PTSD.

If you are not sure if this service is suitable for your needs please get in touch with your local provider who will be able to guide you based on your individual circumstances.

How to Access IAPT

The neonatal units within the East Midlands Network span over 6 counties. 

You can access an IAPT provider based on your home postcode/GP postcode. It is possible that your baby is receiving neonatal care away from home, however,  accessing an IAPT service close to home will make sure you receive local support that is easily accessible for on-going care.

IAPT can be accessed completely confidentially. If you would like more information about IAPT services or you would like to make a self-referral please see the appropriate links below.

Support for parents in NICU

Support Near You

Support for families and parents in Neonatal Units