Neonatal Transport Service

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Neonatal Transport Service

Video Introduction/Tour

The CenTre Neonatal Transport Service provides transport for all the neonatal units within the EMNODN. Last year, the service undertook more than 1250 transfers supervised by the Neonatal transport consultants.

This information leaflet explains in more detail who the CenTre Neonatal Transport Service are and how they will safely move your baby.

If you have already been transferred your feedback can help to make improvements and understand what went well or not so well for you and your family.

It would be appreciated if you would fill in this short survey. Answers are anonymous and will be returned to the service for analysis. Please click on the SurveyMonkey logo below to complete the survey

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In Utero Transfers

If your midwife or obstetrician is concerned that your baby will require neonatal care, they may recommended that you are transferred before you give birth to a hospital that has the necessary facilities for your baby. This is because studies in England have shown that very premature babies do better if they are born in a hospital with neonatal intensive care units on site. However, if in-utero transfer is not possible, all hospitals are able to provide the immediate care your baby needs whilst arrangements are made to transfer your baby to the nearest appropriate neonatal unit.

Transfers Within the EMNODN

There are a few occasions when your baby may need transferring to another hospital.

Some reasons include:

  • If your baby is being cared for in a NICU or LNU that you were not booked at. Your nurses and doctors will aim to transfer your baby to an LNU or SCU as close to home as possible once they no longer require the higher levels of care. These units specialise in preparing you and your baby for discharge.

  • To receive specialist care, equipment or surgery that is provided at another hospital.

  • Your baby may need transferring to another unit because the unit you are in is at full capacity. This will be avoided wherever possible, but on the occasions where this is required your cooperation and understanding is appreciated. We will always ensure that your baby is transferred to a unit which is able to provide the care your baby needs. All efforts will be made to ensure that your baby is cared for in the most appropriate unit which is as close to home as is possible. All transfers will be thoroughly discussed between the referring and receiving units.

Transfers Outside of the EMNODN

If the Network is extremely busy it may be necessary to transfer your baby to a unit outside of the East Midlands Network to ensure that your baby receives the appropriate level of care. We will endeavour to return your baby to a local unit, or a unit within the Network, as soon as possible provided your baby is well enough to be moved.How will my baby be transferred? Your baby will travel to the receiving hospital by ambulance in a special transport incubator. During the journey they will be cared for by a trained transport team of neonatal doctors and nurses.

Will My Baby Be Transferred Without Me?

If you still require hospital care yourself, you will be transferred to a ward within the same hospital as your baby for on-going postnatal care as soon as you are well enough. Every attempt will be made to ensure that you are transferred to be with your baby within 24 hours, or as soon as possible after you are clinically well enough to transfer.
If you are not an inpatient at the time of your baby’s transfer, you may be able to travel in the
ambulance with your baby and the neonatal transport staff. You can talk to the neonatal team to see if this is possible.
If you are well enough to be discharged and cannot travel with your baby, then you will be able to travel with a family member or friend to the hospital using your own mode of transport (mothers post caesarean should not drive). You will be provided with a parent passport to ensure that your partnership and involvement in your baby’s care continues.